5 Ways To Know It’s Time To Quit Your Job

by The Smarter Wallet on December 10, 2010

How do you know it’s time to move on? Here are 5 interesting ways to know that it’s time to quit your job. But make sure that you weigh your options very carefully since the current unemployment rate is still very high.

How much do you like your job? Few of us would say we actually love it although some are lucky enough to have found their niche.

5 Ways To Know It’s Time To Quit Your Job

However, the amount of love you have for your job can have little to do with whether or not you should stay in it. If you work as an employee for someone else, then you will likely arrive at a crossroads at some point. So if you are wondering whether you are standing there now, here are some pointers to bear in mind.

1. Are your emotions entering the picture? I used to have a job that I loved for the first couple of years. Then gradually everything started changing and the place I was working at became unrecognizable from what it was originally. The stress started building up, demands became unreasonable and the turnover was affecting employee dynamics. Eventually, no one was enjoying their work. When I got home and burst into tears one night after a particularly bad day, I realized it was time to make a change — so I did.

2. Do you dread seeing your boss each day? This may not apply to everyone. But if you are getting seriously worried about going into work every day because of your boss, it is definitely time to start looking for another job. No job is worth ruining your weekends over if you spend the whole time dreading Monday morning. Here’s where to check out some job hunting tips.

3. Are you being kept out of meetings? If everyone else is being invited along but you aren’t, this doesn’t bode well for your future. Ask yourself why this could be the case. Perhaps you’re being left out of certain projects because the work may not be in your job description or may not be something that would be relevant to you. But in some cases, it could be the beginning of the end (could you be on your way to a pink slip party?), if they don’t see you as being worthy of more highly visible tasks.

4. Are you spending more and more free time worrying about your job and dreading going back into the office (or where you work)? If you are nodding when you read this, understand that things are not simply going to get better. I’ve been in this situation and so have many other people I know. I have yet to meet anyone who has been there and resolved the problem without actually switching jobs. Bear this in mind and think about focusing your energies on an escape plan.

5. How long has it been since you were given a pay raise? This is a tricky one because it could be the case that the company you work for hasn’t given anyone a pay raise for a while. But it’s more problematic if you’ve been declined a job promotion. Some surreptitious scouting around should reveal whether you are in a party of one, or whether no one has received a pay increase this year. If you are on your own, perhaps it is time to ask yourself why. It could be something you can resolve (perhaps your performance is in question?) –- or it could be time to jump ship.

In short, keep an eye on your own contributions, on your situation and how you are feeling. Normally, the signs that you should jump ship are staring you right in the face, but it’s up to you to act on them.

If you reach this stage, assess your financial position, get your ducks in a row and get moving to another job as soon as possible.

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Sue Kohler December 11, 2010 at 6:18 pm

These are never easy decisions to make but they’re a lot easier if you’re prepared for them. Great tips by the way! I think a big one is number 4… if you’re worrying about your job all the time there isn’t many good reasons to stay. Obviously we need to take care of ourselves and our family but that should be even more reason to get your rear in gear to find a new one.

2 Doable Finance December 20, 2010 at 8:37 am

These are all good points when you work in a profession of some sort. If you have no college education, then you have to stay in your jobs. We all can blame managers as much as we want, but the fact of the matter is we must all have to change attitude towards how we work.

1) We must focus on our performance
2) We must attend any training sessions that the company may offer
3) We must be cooperative and help colleagues
4) We must strive for working better
5) We must not always look up to managers for directions
6) Take initiatives and let your seniors know about it
7) Make contributions in how to improve working conditions
8) Find a “niche” that nobody has attempted yet. Propose it to managers
9) Stop complaining
10) Get out and mingle with your colleagues

There are so many other things you can do to make the place of work interesting for yourself and others.

You will have no genuine reason to raise the five points that you mentioned in your article.

Always remember. It’s your own mindset playing upon you and not that of others. To discard the 5 points completely, you just have a positive attitude and things will turn out your way for the better.

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