Save Money On Gas With These 10 Helpful Tips

by JT on September 8, 2008

Even more tips on how to save money on gas — a topic you can never get tired of these days…

save money on gas

You hear about it everywhere: on the news, in the paper, even in the aisles of the grocery store. It’s the frugality topic du jour: gas prices have become outrageous. Many consumers are actively hoping that the government will finally do something about the relentless rise of gas prices (although it’s probably best to let the market do its thing). But how many people actually take the time to consider the little things they could be doing to save on gas until the economy gets back on track?

Use these 10 tips to help your family survive the gas price crisis. File them along with all the other tips you’ve received on this subject — you can never have enough! 😉 Not only will you save money now, you’ll train yourself to become more conscientious for a lifetime.

Ten Simple Tips To Save Money On Gas

1. Read your vehicle owners manual and determine the lowest grade of gasoline you can use for your car. You may be spending more than you need to because of the misconception that you can only use “the best gas” available.

2. Schedule regular tune-ups and maintenance checks for your vehicle. A well-tuned car and fresh fluids will save on gas and increase your car’s overall efficiency.

cut your gas bill

3. Make sure all tires are inflated properly. Not only will you save on gas but you will also extend the life of your tires.

4. You’ll have better fuel economy if you stop being a lead foot. Speeding uses more gas. This is also true if you rev the engine or habitually start and stop suddenly. Pay attention to how you’re operating your car and you could end up saving a bundle.

5. Try not to fill your tank to the top. Excess gas may just spill out of the tank causing you to end up wasting your money.

6. Make sure you gas tank cap fits properly. Over time the seal can deteriorate and cause gas to evaporate out of the tank. Replace an old cap with one that fits more securely.

save on travel

7. In warm weather, only use the air conditioning when on a highway. When you’re in stop and go traffic, open your windows to save on fuel consumption — that is, if you can handle the heat. Some hot days are pretty brutal, so this recommendation may be harder to follow.

8. In cold weather, your car only needs to warm up for a few minutes before being ready to hit the road. Leaving the car running any longer than that would just be wasting your gas.

9. Keep your trunk clean and free of unnecessary items that weigh down your car to improve your gas mileage. While basic emergency items are fine, anything else could increase your gas consumption unnecessarily.

10. Carefully consider the fuel efficiency of any new vehicle you are looking to purchase. Look into fuel efficient cars and do your homework before checking out the dealerships so you know which vehicles have superior gas mileage and which ones will end up costing you more over time.

 
Images by cybersalt.

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Stock Research September 16, 2008 at 7:16 pm

Good article, especially given the times we’re in. I had heard that one of the biggest frauds out there is about octane and that most engines can only efficiently use the octane levels in the regular or plus grades. The comparison I had heard is to protein in the body- it can only use so much.

2 Daphne Lim October 1, 2008 at 4:11 am

Very useful tips indeed, especially about emptying the trunk and checking the lowest grade fuel possible. I used to carry a golf bag with 14 clubs, roller blades, and basically a whole wardrobe and games room in my trunk and the fuel consumption was ghastly! Another silly thing I did was switch down one fuel grade without checking and the car sputtered on the way home and belched out large plumes of exhaust. The car could not take that grade obviously, and I found out the hard way! So good that you pointed these things out.

3 Until Debt Do US Part October 2, 2008 at 4:39 am

Great tips. I have a few bits of equipment in the trunk of my car in case I breakdown. Things like a jack and a self starter battery kit. These things are heavy but I weigh the cost of having to use extra fuel to carry them against the inconvienence of breakdown and having to get towed.

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